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Brandan Lennox's

Who Deserves My Money?

I recently backed App.net after years of wishing I understood Twitter. Much has been said about App.net’s pricing structure — $50 per year to be a member — and it got me thinking about which other services I pay for on either a monthly or yearly basis. Who am I happy to pay? Who do I pay because I have to?

These are the services I thought of in approximately the order I thought of them:

  • AT&T U-Verse ($48) — 12 Mbps↓, 1.5 Mbps↑. No television or landline service, although they snail mail me once a week with tales of the money I’d save by bundling said services and…paying them more money.
  • AT&T Wireless (~$70) — 200 MB of data, ∞ minutes of voice, no text messages (I send essentially all iMessages). Of the major carriers, this is among the cheapest iPhone post-paid plans that I’m aware of. I’ll be evaluating my options soon since my contract has expired.
  • GitHub ($7) — five private repos, one private collaborator. I don’t write much open source code anymore, but I do occasionally deploy a few private sites with Capistrano, and we use it at work all the time.
  • Instapaper ($1) — far and away the best return-on-investment of all these services. I read in Instapaper almost every day on all my devices. It’s indispensible.
  • Site5 (~$4) — basic shared hosting plan. It’s where this site lives. Shared hosting keeps getting cheaper, but I got tired of changing providers a few years ago, so I continue giving my money to these guys. They’re good.
  • Railscasts ($9) — Ryan Bates deserves my money. He deserves everyone’s money.
  • Typekit (~$5) — Portfolio plan. So far, I’m actually only using this on my resume. (How could I not take advantage of Brandon Grotesque?)
  • Hover (~$1) — one domain registered (you’re looking at it). I like Hover, at least as much as I’ve used it.
  • App.net (~$5) — standard user account. Not being a Twitter user, I don’t have much to say about it re: Twitter. I can follow here practically everyone I’d follow there, and I like that Dalton is making money without advertisers.

This clearly doesn’t include one-time digital content purchases like software and music, but it’s fascinating to see that I pay about three times as much money to AT&T for access to the content I’m interested in than I do to the service and content providers themselves, and to consider how reluctant we web users are to pay even a minimal cost for a service we might love (like Instapaper) while inundating the infrastructure companies with hundreds of our dollars a month.